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probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
. that is the measuring stick bayous. -- measuring stick i use. the second is, do they agree to term limits? i think the number one problem we have is the desire to be there forever, and that tells me it is about them and not us. term limits is a wonderful measuring stick to judge. offer a piece of paper that says, i pledge, and make them sign it. if they do sign it, they have at least one piece of paper in the future. you're not going to get term limits passed by the u.s. congress. it is not fair to generalize it, but there are exceptions. democrat and republican, so this is not partisan statements, but the fact is, too often it is about what is best for the next election and not the next generation. we are hurting america. >> newt gingrich would not make a good nominee for president because he could not make a commitment. are there other examples? >> newt gingrich's one of the smartest man i have ever met. i have served under him four -- four years in the house. i think you can make judgments about the character based on what they're alive says. -- what the alive says. >> -- the life says. when i
, in targeted cities. we talked about how we might do that using our own media networks and also, thanks to you. we believe that, for example, that the national council of churches has made an nationals statement that calls for acceptance of muslim neighbors and have spoken out as strongly as we can about the issues you've heard today. but we have also called on state councils of churches, including for example in florida, to initiate activities in their own communities that will say no to this kind of bigotry. we are getting a response already. we hope that will continue. that was part of the meeting today. not simply to stop with the statement, although it response at the moment and must be heard, but also to carry the word of education and hope into the future by calling on local communities, our own networks, to replicate it. i want to say one other word. you've heard this from reverend cizik. christians in the west have often been responsible for the kind of and tolerant rhetoric we now hear from various places in this country-- intolerant rhetoric we now hear from various places in the co
carefully at other countries. join us essential experience, international economist could examine the origins of the banking and currency crises in some detail. they have devoted considerable research tohe international contagion of financial crises, a related topic of obvious relevance to our recent experience. finally, macroeconomic modeling must accommodate the possibility of unconventional monetary policies and number of which have been used during the crisis. earlier work on this topic relies on the example of japan, now, unfortunately, we have more data points. the experience of the united states and the united kingdom with large-scale asset purchases could be explored this is that we can understand the affect of these transactions and how they could be incorporated into modern models. i began my remarks by drawing a distinction between the scientific, engineering, and managementspects of economics. for the most part, the financial crisis reflected problems in economic engineering and economic management. this private-sector arrangements, for exame risk management and fundin
not trust us, they will not keep coming back. continue >> and a month-long look at privacy in communications policy. >> the c-span video library is a great resource to see what is happening in washington. find the most recent events covered, those most watched, and most covered -- all free. >> governor tim pawlenty is widely considered to be contemplating a presidential run in 2012. he recently sat down with c-span to talk about his plans for the future. this is just under 40 minutes. >> has there been a defining moment for you as governor of minnesota? >> probably many, but i will give you two. one is the support we have given to the men and women in a national -- national military, and the national guard. we have stepped up in unprecedented ways to support them. we lead the nation in the beyond the yellow ribbon campaign. the other thing, for minnesota, i am in stick it has been liberal through history, and for me to draw a line on driving down government spending and will be on cutting taxes is something i'm also proud of. >> the president has said that next year in july 2011, it is a tra
? to help us discuss these issues, we have invited a group of excellent panelists. these dedicated men and women are familiar with many of the current obstacles that we must overcome to ensure a timely release of diversity data. and the data becomes very important for a lot of us as we begin to assess and evaluate where that company is and what needs to be done. in reality, it's an asset when they do provide that, that we can actually help them progress and advance, and increase their revenue and relationship in the community. you have to look at it from the positive side and not just from the negative. but it actually enhances that company's growth and future if they provide that kind of data because there is a variety of organizations that can provide assistance in further enhancing the growth and development as we see the demographics of our society changing within us. to start off with as our first panelist, we have carlos orta. he has been president and chief executive officers of the has panic -- hispanic organization of corporate responsibility. it is at a level of economic comp
questions out there but the rulemaking is going to need to clarify for us. but kind is based on even where you think it's coming out today, how is it going to change what you do? >> well, specifically on the pension side because they did something that was pretty smart a couple years ago they entered into a long-duration program, where we moved more of the pension investments from equity into fixed income. and so also looking at doing more physical interest rate swap. the same is to minimize the interest rate volatility. if you want to add on additional 10 to $15 billion in interest rate depending on how legislation decides to set the initial variation margin, you may forgo doing some of that because so much capital is being set aside and entered into a hedging portfolio pictures they knew what to limit volatility. but now you're adding this cash component because you have to set aside that much working capital. honestly hopefully the look of the maybe complex securities and do other things and do more net income aware that risk is minimized and so the cache is being set aside. but for us
city bombing was about half a ton of explosions. nuclear weapons, the unit used is thousands of tons. it takes about 25 truck loads, semitrucks. there have been megaton weapons as well. think about something completely different. do not think in terms of just another explosion. the original five nuclear club was formed. it become clear they were the ones that would control the intent around the world. what if that hadn't happened or suppose we didn't understand all the things we did about notify indication. we maloufed it was possible to make explosions. that took a lost effort to do. what if it had not happened? >> it is a great sport for people not involved in relay history. if discovery hadn't been made, what would the world have been capable of doing without that? my wife hates it because i watch the history channel. there were eight wars by the time i was in middle school. eight strategic wars and vietnam for us. we new world war i left about 20 million people dead. without nuclear weapons, what is the world tapeable of doing in terms of conventional arment. think about world wa
government here in washington, d.c. >> if you think it is a federal policy to use the filibuster to block any legislation? >> i think we should do everything we can to extend the current tax rates. raising taxes on anyone, especially small business, is the wrong prescription for an ailing economy. >> the republican party has harnessed the voter sentiment. >> i think that most of the uprising that we have seen thus far we have seen in the primaries. now that we are out of the primary season, all of our candidates have to work closely with all of these americans that are newly engaged in their government. we want to encourage americans to take an active role in their government because when americans are engaged, washington listens. when the american people are not engaged, then the politicians are in charge. we have seen what that has led to. >> what impact did the primaries have? >> alito that they and other americans will stay engaged in what is happening in washington on a daily basis. if they work with their members, both democrats and republicans, they can drive the debate and they can dr
of the conversations over the weekend. for us, it was less about -- and i understand all of the noise about crisis and bailout and morale hazard. lehman had the capital. we needed the liquidity. we had four -- we went into that last weekwith over $40 billion of liquidity, we lost close to 30 in three days. we needed the liquidity. i really cannot answer you, sir, as to why the federal reserve and the treasury and the sec together chose to not only provide support for liquidity, but also not to have opened the window to lehman that sunday night as it did to all of our competitors. i must tell you when i first heard about the fact that the window was open for expanded collateral, a number of my finance and treasury team came into my offense -- office and said we're fine. we have the collateral. we can pledge it. we're fine. 45 minutes later, they came back and said, that window is not open to lehman brothers. >> yes, that is in the chronology. all right. mr. baxter, let me follow up on this. in addition to the -- did you see political considerations in the timeline? you see the debate about the fina
guest has been david armor. thank you for being with us this morning. that is all for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern to take your calls. have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . . çççç-our live coverageç ofe afternoon session will be here ççthe commission will hear frm people that deal with oil spills inçç alaska.% çtheçç session beginsçç at0 er(kspan. ççççççdavid axelrodçç jd ççpolitico in a decision onçe 2010 midterm elections. our look atçç privacy and communication policies by focusing onç the federalç laws that limit data collection. ç >> this was the second time that the court heard the case. earlier this year a two judge panel from the ninth circuit overturned laws because they were disproportionately affecting minorities. this is just over one hour. >> good afternoon. we are here they hear the argument [unintelligible] and we have judged gould appearing by video from seatt
country. thanks for joining us on "washington journal" and will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern half to take your calls. . >> happening right now on c-span 2, the impeachment trial of louisiana federal judge thomas porteus accused of taking bribes. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] senators are considering a judicial nomination before resuming debate on a small business bond. the bill includes $12 billion in tax breaks, an additional small business support for it live coverage when the senate comes in this afternoon at 2: 30 eastern. domestic manufacturing and energy efficiency, live coverage on cspan when the house gavels in tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> every weekend on cspan 3, experience american history. 48 hours of people and events telling the american story. here historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts by events that shaped our nations. visit museums, historical sites, and college campuses as professors and leading historians tell them to america's past. am
for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then you have a problem. they looked at the afghan presidential election and started rethinking whether or not we had a credible partner that we could work with, by, and threw in afghanistan. if you look at the way we americans look at counterinsurgency, we are a lot from the british and different experiences of the 20th-century. -- the british and french experiences of the 20th-century. the british and northern -- the british in northern ireland, they thought they were in their own turf. by the same token, the french in algeria, the french considered algeria part of metropolitan france. it was non-negotiable. when the conflict began, algeria was a part of france. that was not from the perspective of the fln. that informed the way they thought about the conflict. you kind of assume that your interests will line up with the host governme
him lessons that then he goes on to use to great effect later. host: political oper tunist? guest: yes. host: yoo license is s. grant? guest: he is considered one of the highest oper tunists and because of that he gets thrown out, because he really didn't have any political experience before he became president. so is his breath number, the number of positions he eserved end up way outside the norm. host: harry trueman. guest: trueman is one of those interesting things. as i recall, i would have to go back and look at my data. but as i recall he is actually an oper tunist, but it's because he served sort of short term in many of his underlying positions. host: barack obama. guest: he is officially not. but there was one from the 2008 election that actually had one of the highest scores. certainly higher than president clinton. host: why? guest: because he had run for more offices in a short period of time, where as senator clinton, at the time i counted her first lady experience as essentially one position, eight years. so that essentially disadvantages her. host: with barack obama, di
needed that becomes too big to fail. the bill doesn't give us the authority but it does give us the authority if we despair of these other methods that we believe the firm in size and complexity is dangerous we have both of the living will requirement but also the authority regulators collectively to break up firms. i don't know the answer to that question. that is the charge congress has been -- given the regulators and we take seriously that charge. we put in place some reasonable approaches, but i appreciate your historical perspective which says over the long run you have to take into account the political influence of these large institutions. >> in terms of the will of the institutions themselves, there is a division in american industry. some industries have adopted levels of self regulation, in depth, an acceptable behavior for instance nuclear power industry has developed impressive processes. best practice and enforcement, on the other hand. they had just seen one of the manifestations. the financial community or nuclear power industry or more like deepwater drilling.
impressions. they get impressions like a large percentage of rigs are false. when the fbi tells us that, it is not true. they say dna does not matter was the attacker was a stranger or we have a suspect identified. in fact, having dna evidence in and is crucial for any prosecution of these days. juries expect it. a corporate the victims' stories. it establishes patterns of a serial rapist. the data we have is insufficient for our needs and impede our ability to report and why so few rapists and up in prison. we would like to see the department of justice track rate cases from initial reports all the way through ultimate disposition. based on what we know, there are a few things congress can do now. they can first past the act passed in the house which would create a national registry of forensic evidence for sexual attack cases. it would provide crucial information and open up data to the media so that we can have investigative reports to help us see what is going on elsewhere. it would allow us to track raids by jurisdiction. --rapes by jurisdiction. we could incorporate the registrati
to use that power. you ally have to be authoritarian in that croor. most jurors are coming into your courtroom having watched things on television or in the movies that is still not the real thing. it's important to take them step by step in the process, especially in important cases. the other thing i tell jurors is i refer to hamlet. even in a capital case there may be moment when something happened that it's funny. and it happened to the moussaoui case. with the human enterprise trial. remember in hamlet, there is comic relief. it doesn't mean the whole play isn't a tragedy. if this means this is a human enterprise where people laugh. you try to set the tone for the jurors. they really understand what we in the courtroom are going to be hearing together. and so i think even if the president thinks the outcome is a done deal, it isn't if we set the right tone in the courtroom. >> i would say if you were appointed defense lawyer in the case you would do everything you can to get that in front of the jury buzz of the fruche dangerousness of the defendant. rob and i were talking about
it completely right. the problem is not islam. the problem are people who have used islam to commit violent acts against our country and our people but what happened after we asked all these questions was a cottage industry who actually had an ax to grind against muslims and against arabs in particular, they ended up providing most of the answers. they wrote books and got them published. they testified before congress and dominateded the air waves on radio and television. i will never forget a hearing held in the senate on islam featuring three guys who -- actually if you had the reverse and the three muslims were testifying on the nature of judaism in an arab country, you would hear whoops and yells. but it was acceptable for this to happen. and the lies they told and the bigotry they spread were horrific. and yet people were nodding in the audience because that's all they heard. that's all they were in a position to hear. these guys inflated every incidents of violence as somehow evidence they were right, and they have done damage. shortly after 9/11 when we polled america, what we found was p
for us is trying to get our six-party friends led by china to work with us to try to convince who's ever in leadership in north korea that their future would be far better served by denuclearizing, and that remains our goal. >> as always, thank you so much. [laughter] for coming here, first of all, but also giving such a thorough and complete and comprehensive talk about american foreign policy. and i know i speak for everyone that we wish you godspeed and more in your work next week and >> on c-span tonight, president obama talks about the economy during a visit to the ohio. jo bonner holds a town hall meeting in his district. the democratic national committee holds a -- an event in philadelphia. former gov. george pataki focuses on health care. >> at long last, the united states of america joins every other nation in the world to say that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> we have been covering town hall meetings. what's them on line at the c- span a video library. they are searchable and free on your computer any time. the c-span networks -- we provide coverage of politics, p
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19